Stephanie Mehta, Fortune

Stephanie Mehta, senior writer
Fortune Magazine 
January 2007
 

Where tech and media intersect…

...is "what I consider my sweet spot," she says. For years Stephanie has "written a lot about companies as corporate institutions" but now finds it "interesting how traditional telecommunications companies have become distribution platforms for media and content," previously the domain of cable and satellite operators, "and now cable and satellite are moving into where telecom used to dominate."

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Engadget, Gizmodo Trump the WSJ, NY Times

The Wall Street Journal--New York Times rivalry has spilled into the consumer tech blogosphere, but their real enemy is not one another. It's specialists such as Engadget and Gizmodo, who in covering CES and Macworld showed more imagination, posted more items and inspired more reader feedback than the hallowed New York dailies.

 

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Andreas Kluth, Economist

Andreas Kluth, technology correspondent
The Economist
November 2006

 

Welcome to my week

  • "My office is wherever I am. I'm a one-man show. I'm my own tech support, admin, everything." (Add to that a dad and a teacher at Berkeley - so evenings and weekends are usually out for meetings.)
  • The Economist is "officially a newspaper" so "I try to react to news."
  • "My weekly rhythm is determined by the London time zone," which means he wakes up a day behind and his deadlines come a day sooner. It's "kind of a nightmare."
  • Monday morning PST, the day in London is already over, edit decisions are already made, and he has until "literally Tuesday night" to file. This means he's often writing a week ahead.
  • Tight deadlines mean anything he's shown in advance -- something to happen on Wednesday or Thursday -- is automatically put off until the following week. "If you wait till Wednesday or Thursday, I cannot really react."
  • The average workday puts about "300 e-mails, not counting the Viagra spam," into his inbox. "Of those, there are probably ten unbelievably important ones." The others are PR e-mails.
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Laurianne McLaughlin, CIO Magazine

Laurianne McLaughlin
Tech editor, CIO Magazine and CIO.com
 
November 2006

 

Innovation

Today’s CIOs are not only expected to execute on their regular duties, but also must contribute ideas and projects that drive revenue. As a result, Laurianne and company at CIO Magazine are focusing on innovation. “It’s a big theme we’re hearing from the audience this year, and we are working hard to produce stories around that issue.”

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Jim Rapoza, Lab Director, eWeek

Jim Rapoza, lab director
eWeek
October 2006
 

Reviews from eWeek Labs

The priority for Jim is ensuring that the reviews approach brings a full enterprise focus to the product.

The Beat

It's a monster: (web authoring and development tools, multimedia development, document and content management, portals and knowledge management, browsers, commerce and B2B applications, application servers, web servers, general labs questions) but Jim points out that most of the bullet items on the list aren't constantly being released. "It's part of the job. You have to get the product in and get it tested." He also adds that with such a senior team he relies on them to tell what what products are interesting and recommends PR pros go directly to them on products in their area of expertise.

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Scott Kirsner, Boston Globe, Fast Company

Scott Kirsner
Freelance writer: Boston Globe, Fast Company, et al
September 2006

 

Why Hollywood?

"Hollywood is a good example of how most established industries react to technology; they're kind of slow to adopt them," he says. The topic is front and center on his radar for a book project he's working on. Plus, "It's fun." He's privy to film festivals and movie premiers: "you see the movie and then the director or the star is there to talk to you about it afterward."

He gets around:

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Michael Totty, Wall Street Journal

Michael Totty, news editor
Wall Street Journal
August 2006
 

Michael's been with the Journal for 13 years, spending much of it (seven years) in the Texas regional office before moving to be editor of the California edition in 2000. When the regional editions were rolled up, he moved to the tech reports. In that capacity he plans and edits the tech reports for the year, fielding story ideas from reporters as well as coming up with some on his own. He also does some reporting, but as an editor first he doesn't write a lot. In last 12 months Michael's written only 16 times and says "that's a good number for me -- I couldn't stand to write less."

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Mike Masnick, Techdirt

Mike Masnick, editor and founder

(a free service of Techdirt Corporate Intelligence)

July 2006

Techdirt has been around since before the word "blog" existed. Now it is home for 12 -- a mixture of writers, tech folks, sales and marketing

Private research

The core of Techdirt's business today is private research - customized, detailed corporate intelligence reports. Mike explains it this way: "insightful, opinionated posts on competitive areas including the tech market, and legal trends, up-to-date in a quick, insightful manner that lets them do their job and be more intelligent about what they do every day." They have three dozen clients, most Fortune 500. Among those willing to go on the record are Volkswagen and Verisign.

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Pages

Journalists are leaving media brands every week. Read the fruits of 16 confidential interviews with journalists now working at tech brands or PR agencies, and five interviews with the executives who hired these journalists.
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